Who We Are

Our Mission

The mission of Omaha Home for Boys is to support and strengthen youth, young adults and families through services that inspire and equip them to lead independent and productive lives.

For nearly 100 years, the Home has been empowering at-risk youth with the skills and confidence needed to transition from a state of crisis to those of safety and growth. We serve more than 300 young men and women annually through our three core programs:  Inspiration Hill Residential Care, Jacobs’ Place Transitional Living and Branching Out Independent Living. Our support programs, such as 4-H, our Youth Employment Program, Omaha Home for Boys School and our Wellness Program, allow us to shape well-rounded youth who are ready to lead independent, productive lives.

 

The Home is a nonprofit, nonsectarian 501(c)(3) charitable organization providing treatment and care to more than 300 young men and women each year regardless of race, religion or ability to pay.

Non-profit Status, Financials & Reports

  •  503(c)(3)
  •  Form-990
  •  Audit
  •  Annual Report

FAQs

What is the Omaha Home for Boys?
The Omaha Home for Boys is comprised of three core programs: Inspiration Hill Residential Care, Jacobs’ Place Transitional Living and Branching Out Independent Living. Each program is unique in its own way, yet they share the common goal to help youth develop the skills and confidence needed to lead independent, productive lives. The Home serves youth ages 14 to 24 from across the state of Nebraska.
How do youth come to the Omaha Home for Boys Residential Care Program and how long do they stay?
The Omaha Home for Boys Residential Care Program is for high school age boys and young men from across the state of Nebraska. Youth in our Residential Care Program must be court-ordered for admission with the average length of stay being less than one year.
Do the youth attend public schools?
Education is a vital component of all three of Omaha Home for Boys’ programs. Our Residential Care Youth attend the Omaha Home for Boys School on our main campus. The school focuses on credit recovery and accrual with the goal of helping youth meet grade level expectations by program completion. Youth in our Jacobs’ Place and Branching Out Programs receive education assistance in a number of areas including college preparatory courses, financial aid assistance and scholarships.
Do the boys attend church?
A solid spiritual foundation is critical to the youths’ success. Each youth attends worship services every week with their families or homes. In addition, prayers and devotions are a regular part of their daily life.
How can I support your youth?
There are a number of ways you can offer support to our young men and women – monetary gifts to the Home, include the Home in your will, donate goods to Youth Mart or make a donation of grain or livestock to the 4-H program. Simply click on the following button to learn more about our many giving options. Donate
What type of facilities do you have?
The Home’s main campus that houses our Residential Care Program consists of 59 acres at 52nd and Ames Streets in Omaha. Our main campus has eight residential homes, a dining hall, a recreation center, the Omaha Home for Boys School, a museum and administration buildings. The Jacobs’ Place campus houses our Transitional Living Program and is located at 48th and Cuming Streets. Jacobs’ Place includes two apartment buildings both with five units and a learning center.
Is Omaha Home for Boys active in the community?
Absolutely! The Home would not be approaching its 100th anniversary without working collaboratively with many youth-serving organizations across the region. Some of these include Project Everlast, Charles Drew, Child Saving Institute, H&J Counseling, Region 6, PromiseShip and Juvenile Probation. Additionally, the Home is a contributing member of the following collaborative groups that advocate for at-risk youth:  Opportunity Youth Alliance, MACCH, Metro Area Suicide Prevention Coalition, Another Planned Permanent Living Arrangement (APPLA), Traditional Resources for Youth (TRY), Opportunity Youth Success, and Strengthening Families Act Committee.